Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

C

Craft/object

Creative New Zealand sees craft/object art as including the traditional applied arts and contemporary practices of all the peoples of Aotearoa/New Zealand, including Māori and Pasifika peoples and the diverse cultures of people living in Aotearoa/New Zealand today. Genres include, but are not limited to, ceramics, furniture, glass, jewellery, object making, studio-based design, raranga, tāniko, tapa making, textiles, tivaevae, typography, and weaving. For design, our focus is on the development and/or public presentation of new work by independent studio-based designers. Creative New Zealand recognises that the boundaries between craft/object art and the visual arts are not precise. Makers and artists usually define for themselves how their practice, or different aspects of their practice, relates to a given artform.

Creating or developing a work

The activity will result in the creation or development of art work. Eg. towards a creative development workshop, to write a novel

D

Dance

Dance includes classical and contemporary dance; street, experimental and integrated dance; and traditional and contemporary Maori and Pacific Island dance.

Developing audiences or markets

The activity aims to increase audience engagement and to encourage new audiences; and/or aims to develop new or existing markets for the arts through strategic investments and partnerships. Eg. attending an international arts market

Documentation, discourse or archiving

The activity will result in written, visual and/or auditory material documenting, appraising, reviewing or archiving arts practice. Eg. Towards a documentary about an artist

E

Exhibiting or Performing

The activity is the public presentation of an art work. Eg. Visual arts exhibition, music concert, dance performance, theatrical performance, opera performance

I

Interarts

Interarts projects integrate artforms of any cultural tradition, combining them to create a new and distinct work. The result of this integration is a hybrid or fusion of artforms outside of Creative New Zealand’s artform categories.

K

Kaupapa Pasifika

Pacific Arts applications are assessed on the extent to which Kaupapa Pasifika is evident in the practice and results of the proposed project. Kaupapa Pasifika refers to a foundation of understanding and knowledge created by Pasifika people and expressing Pasifika aspirations, values and principles. It is based on these two concepts: Kaupapa – awareness of the unique cultural perspectives of a distinct group of New Zealanders. Pasifika – the unique cultural perspectives and beliefs embodied in the values, customs, rituals, dance, song, language and cultural expressions of the individual Pasifika nations. The combination of the two attributes reflects the unique context of Aotearoa-­based Pasifika communities, their Pasifika aspirations, values and principles and desire to express cultural values and world views that relate to their experience as Pasifika peoples living in New Zealand. When assessing a culturally-specific heritage arts application, it will replace the concept of Kaupapa Pasifika with the specific island group, for example, Kaupapa Samoa or Kaupapa Fiji. This is similar to the terms Fa’a Samoa or Vaka Viti meaning ’the Samoan way’ or ’the Fijian way’.

L

Literature

Literature is a broad, inclusive concept. Creative New Zealand will consider proposals from writers and illustrators to research and write high-quality work in fiction or non-fiction. Fiction includes, but isn’t limited to, novels, novellas, short stories, poetry, children’s fiction, young adult fiction, graphic novels, illustrated picture books, and speculative fiction such as fantasy fiction, science fiction, detective fiction, and historical fiction. Non-fiction includes, but isn’t limited to, autobiography, biography, essays, social commentary, literary criticism, reviews, analytical prose, non-fiction written for children, young adult non-fiction, and writing about the physical and natural sciences.

M

Multidisciplinary

Projects and activities that do not feature one main artform and that involve at least two different artforms, of any cultural tradition.

Music

Music includes classical and contemporary music; orchestral, choral, and band music; opera; jazz and improvised music; sound art; contemporary popular music; 'world' music; and traditional and contemporary Māori and Pacific Island music.

Mātauranga Māori

Mātauranga Māori literally translated means ‘Māori knowledge’. It’s a modern term that broadly includes traditions, values, concepts, philosophies, world views and understandings derived from uniquely Māori cultural points of view. It traverses customary and contemporary systems of knowledge. In everyday situations, Mātauranga Māori is an umbrella term that draws on knowledge systems such as whakapapa (genealogy), tikanga Māori (Māori protocol), manaaki (hospitality and consideration), taonga tuku iho Māori (treasured arts and heritage).

N

New Zealand Work

Original work created by a New Zealand citizen or resident (whether living or dead), and the subsequent presentations or exhibitions of that work.

O

Organisational development

The activity is to develop the capability of the organisation. Eg. developing a new strategic plan OR refreshing the governance function of the organisation

P

Providing services

The activity provides services for artists/members/arts groups /organisations. Eg. providing: information, newsletters, professional development, licensing, seminars, contract advice

Publishing

The activity is the publication of written and/or illustrated work, including E books and audio books. Eg. An artform publication, a non-fiction title published as part of a block-grant

R

Recording

The activity is the audio, visual and/or electronic recording of artwork. Eg. Recording a live jazz performance

Researching

Undertaking research in preparation for creating a work. Eg. Research for writing a novel, research about New Zealand arts or artists.

S

Skills development

The activity is to develop the skills and/or knowledge of the participants for example artists/arts practitioners. Eg. masterclass, internship, mentoring, coaching, post-graduate study overseas, workshops, wananga, fono

T

Theatre

Theatre includes both classical and contemporary theatre, and all genres such as comedy, drama, physical theatre, devised theatre, street theatre, musical theatre, circus, puppetry, mask and theatre for children.

V

Visual arts

Visual arts includes, but is not limited to, drawing, experimental sound/audio and moving-image arts projects, installation, kōwhaiwhai, painting, performance within a visual arts context, photography, printmaking, sculpture, tā moko, and typography. Visual arts also includes customary and contemporary practices of all the peoples of Aotearoa/New Zealand, including Māori and Pasifika peoples and the diverse cultures of people living in Aotearoa/New Zealand today.